Calow Berry Farms, LLC
Grower of the Aronia Berry
 

Health Information

What is oxidation in the body? This is the process during normal cell metabolism, where highly reactive compounds called Oxygen Free Radicals are created. They travel through cells, disrupting the structure of other molecules, causing cell damage. Every day, the cells in our body wage a battle against these free radicals that are believed to contribute to  cancer, heart disease, the effects of aging, and more. The job of the antioxidant therefore is to protect

components of a cell from oxidative damage. Antioxidants scavenge free radicals, convert them to harmless substances, absorb them or attach to them before the free radicals can attack normal tissues, destroy cellular proteins or enzymes, or even cause DNA mutations leading to cancer.


Efficacy in disease models

Chokeberries' rich antioxidant content may be beneficial as a dietary preventative for reducing the risk of diseases caused by oxidative stress. Among the models under evaluation where preliminary results show benefits of chokeberry anthocyanins are colorectal cancer (Lala et al. 2006), cardiovascular disease (Bell & Gochenaur 2006), chronic inflammation (Han et al. 2005), gastric mucosal disorders (peptic ulcer) (Valcheva-Kuzmanova et al. 2005), eye inflammation (uveitis) (Ohgami et al. 2005) and liver failure (Valcheva-Kuzmanova et al. 2004).


How many antioxidants should we be consuming daily?

The USDA researchers suggest a daily intake at the minimum of 3,500 antioxidant points. The average person consumes about 1,400 antioxidant points daily. There is a huge gap between what we should be consuming and what we are actually consuming.

ORAC: Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity. This is a testing method developed by the USDA to measure the ability of a substance to absorb free radicals.

In 2007, scientists with the United States Department of Agriculture published an updated list of ORAC values for 277 foods commonly consumed by the U.S. population (fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, spices, grains, etc.).[5] Values were reported as micromoles of Trolox equivalents (TE, vitamin E derivative) per 100 grams both for lipid-soluble ("lipophilic" as for carotenoids) and water-soluble ("hydrophilic" as for phenolics) antioxidant chemicals in foods, thus were a sum of lipophilic and hydrophilic values or total ORAC. These values are considered to be more accurate than previously published ORAC numbers because lipophilic values were being included for the first time.


USDA data on foods with high levels of antioxidant phytochemicals



                                                                                                        

Food

Cinnamon, ground

Aronia black chokeberry

Small Red Bean

Wild blueberry

Red kidney bean

Pinto bean

Blueberry

Cranberry

Artichoke hearts

Blackberry

Prune

Raspberry

Strawberry

Red Delicious apple

Granny Smith apple

Pecan

Sweet cherry

Black plum

Russet potato

Black bean

Plum

Gala apple

True Chocolate

 

Serving size

100 grams

100 grams

½ cup dried beans

1 cup

½ cup dried beans

½ cup

1 cup (cultivated berries)

1 cup (whole berries)

1 cup, cooked

1 cup (cultivated berries)

½ cup

1 cup

1 cup

1 apple

1 apple

1 oz

1 cup

1 plum

1, cooked

½ cup dried beans

1 plum

1 apple

1 Chocolate

Antioxidant capacity per serving size

267,536

16062

13727

13427

13259

11864

9019

8983

7904

7701

7291

6058

5938

5900

5381

5095

4873

4844

4649

4181

4118

3903

3040